Peter Margonelli grew up in a small industrial town in Connecticut. He had an early fascination with anything mechanical. By the time he was nine, he was navigating his motorboat off the Connecticut coast and cruising through town on a bicycle powered by a lawnmower motor. Cars and girls made their inevitable arrival by his teens. Movie and still cameras took over by his early twenties. With an old Leica in hand, he blew out of his hometown and set out to see the world. He returned two years later with crates of slides shot all over Europe, India and the Far East — and half the places in between. Peter attended the Tisch School of the Arts at NYU, graduated and immediately set off to photograph the Moghul gardens of India for House & Garden.

The magazine project led him to a career photographing gardens and interiors which included a number of books, editorial assignments, and advertising campaigns. Peter became widely recognized for his interior photography and the skillful manipulation of natural light to produce luminous interiors for global publication.

Throughout his time in New York, he has continuously travelled to the outskirts and neighboring cities, fascinated by the surrounding industrial landscapes. Initially he produced a series of stark black and white photographs of the industrial architecture in the coal region of PA.

Subsequently, he began shooting landscapes from the vantage of train and automobile windows where perpetual movement abstracts the landscape. These landscapes were exhibited and reviewed in the US and internationally. His newest works utilizes the aerial perspective of a drone-mounted camera to transform the landscape into unique patterns and forms.

About the work:

Peter’s work focuses on depicting time and the traces and memories it leaves in its wake. His landscapes—often taken from the window of a train, car, or plane—reveal brief glimpses of forgotten, liminal spaces. They are neither a point of departure nor a destination—they are the fleeting moments of beauty that are not intentionally sought-after but are inadvertently discovered along a journey. They exist like flashes of vivid memory: an evocative moment floating to the top of a sea of lost details, blurred by the passage of time.